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Is it time to ban long unpaid internships?

Posted by: Rana Barker 22 Nov 17  | Recruitment News



Is it time to ban long unpaid internships?

The vast majority of people in the UK support banning long unpaid internships. In a recent survey held by the ‘Social Mobility Commission’ 72% of the people polled said they were behind a change in the law, with 42% “strongly supporting” a ban. The vote in last month's private member's bill may be the start of changing the way some 10 - 15,000 current unpaid interns are rewarded. The arguments for and against such a review of the law is exhaustive and really exposes the attitude of employers in Britain today. With a growing skills-gap and the need for young people with STEM-related degrees, graduates have changed their approach to work.

Not only are they leaving their degrees with an extortionate amount of debt, but they also have to deal with Brexit, salaries that are not growing at the rate of inflation and stereotypical attitudes.




Young people are still faced with the same issues that have plagued their job search for decades. They are unable to get a job because they have no experience; or unable to get experience because they can’t afford to work for free.

David Leyshon Managing Director of CBSbutler feels that a ban on long-term unpaid internships would be “positive news if enforced as new legislation. Interns have been exploited for too long and it is encumbering. Employers should pay at the very least a minimum wage on day one” ”

If you are graduate looking for your first engineering role, then read The Engineer's 6 key steps on how to get your first graduate engineering job. 

CBSbutler is a multi-award winning recruiter specialising in technical (STEM) appointments across global industries. We show success in finding talent where others fail.


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